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Maltron Dual Hand Fully Ergonomic Keyboards

SKU: DUAL-HAND-KB
Price:
$822.00

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  • Maltron Dual Hand Fully Ergonomic Keyboards


  • R.S.I. Recovery - The Way Forward

  • In recent years many keyboard operators have experienced the pain and frustration of injuries arising from their work. This has often led to enforced unemployment and subsequent legal action to seek compensation. A recent Court award of £150,000 underlines the extent of the damage that can occur and the costs involved.
  • Maltron ergonomic keyboards are specifically designed and shaped to fit the easy movements of hands, fingers and thumbs. As a result they look very different from the usual flat keyboard and this can be a daunting sight for some! however, we believe that these are the best ergonomic keyboards available today.
  • By using a Maltron anti RSI keyboard, the result for well over 3,000 users who have adapted, is a substantial reduction of pain and often a recovery of their career prospects. Although not everyone is freed of all problems, the majority do benefit.
  • Please Note: Maltron keyboards are now only available with USB connectors.
  • Note in the anatomical image below how all the tendons come together at the wrist. Correct hand posture at this point is essential to prevent restriction of movement which can lead to injury.
  • Anatomical image of the lower arm, wrist and hand showing how all the tendons come together at the wrist.
  • In addition this is why, despite their popularity, soft gel wrist support pads are not recommended as they press into the soft part of the wrist and put further pressure on the tendons and may also restrict blood flow to the hand. The unusual shape of the Maltron keyboard often gives rise to questions concerning how to place the hands to take advantage of the strain free design.
  • The best way to assess this is to do the following actions:

  1. Either standing or seated, allow both arms to fall totally relaxed by the sides.

  2. Open and close the hands 2 or 3 times and then allow them to be totally relaxed.

  3. Look at the finger shape. Usually seen in the half open position the finger end directions now lie at 70-90 degrees from the forearm axis, with the wrists still totally relaxed.

  4. Keeping the hands in this position, raise the forearms to be horizontal, and position the hands so that there is a distance of roughly 20cms. between the index fingers.

  5. Opening and closing the fingers now shows that the ends move in arcs of different radius.

  6. As far as possible the keys have been positioned to fit these, so that lowering the hands on to the keys should give comfortable finger positions on the ASDF on the Left and the JKL; keys on the Right. The thumbs should be relaxed to fall on the Space and Enter keys.

  7. The back of the hands will also be tilted to give angles of about 30 deg. to the horizontal, and a strain free wrist position.

  8. When keying, the palms should be around 1cm. above the resting pads, but at any pause for 'thinking' time they should be lowered on to the pads immediately, and the hands and arms relaxed.

  • The keyboard should be mounted low enough to ensure that the horizontal arm position and the conditions of 7 & 8 above are fully met. This may mean mounting it on a pull out slide under the desk top, or sitting on a chair high enough to give this condition with the keyboard on top of the desk.

  • We do not recommend resting the palms when typing as this restricts the small amount of hand movement needed for smooth typing. But for small pauses or 'thinking time', as noted above, the palms should be immediately dropped onto the rests and all arm muscles relaxed completely. By doing this, sustained strain is avoided, muscles and nerves receive a better blood flow and RSI type problems do not develop, indeed, as noted in user reports, recovery can be achieved.

  • Dual Handed Keyboard (USB) Notes

    • L Type keyboards have native USB controllers with four separate key-tables. This allows both PC and Apple key-codes to be supported for two of the following letter layouts:
      • Qwerty
      • Maltron
      • Dvorak (US and UK only - single engraved).
    • For Maltron/Qwerty dually engraved layouts either layout may be dominant i.e. the one engraved on the key-tops with CAPITAL letters. N.B. Please note that Dvorak and Qwerty keyboards are single layout engraved only.
    • Key tops are:
      • Single or Dual engraved.
      • PC or Apple dominant.
    • Languages:
      • English US - (PC / Mac)
      • French (Azerty) - (PC / Mac)
      • English UK - (PC / Mac)
      • Danish - (PC / Mac)
      • German (Qwertz) - (PC / Mac)
      • Norwegian-Norsk - (PC / Mac)
      • Spanish - (PC / Mac)
  • PC and Apple Mac Computer Support.

    • Note: Due to locale differences between PC and Apple computers some secondary symbols on some keys may not always match the primary language key-tops.
    • For example, on a UK PC keyboard the top left hand symbol key on the number/symbol row has three symbols " ` ¬ ¦ ", however these are " § ± " on an Apple computer.
    • Remember keyboards return key position codes, not actual letters/symbols. The translation from key position to key letter/symbol is done on the computer.

 

  • "Amazingly Effective"

    • As noted above, the well being and careers of over 3,000 operators have been saved by the change to a Maltron anti RSI keyboard. Elaine Housby comments "Conventional keyboards now seem quite ridiculous to me." And MacUser Magazine reported "The Maltron ergonomic keyboard is perfect for those suffering from or trying to elude RSI."
    • Dr. John Foster, until recently Medical Adviser to East Midlands Electricity has written of his "pleasure" "surprise" and "amazement" at the way the change to Maltron ergonomic keyboards rapidly enabled 2 of their operators to return to full time work after being off work for months with painful hands and arms. His original letter follows and is in turn followed by his more recent ideas for a way forward for serious RSI cases now that the Government is taking a more positive view about getting people back to work.
  • East Midlands Electricity, Nottingham. - 10th February 1997

    • Dear Sir,
    • I felt that I must write to you and express my pleasure and I must confess surprise which occurred when two of our employees started using a Maltron keyboard. Both these two ladies had developed a severe problem in the use of conventional keyboards resulting in both of them developing painful hands and forearms - a typical W.R.U.L.D. They were sent to an orthopaedic surgeon who confirmed this diagnosis, by this time they had been off work for several months and faced a very uncertain future.
    • By sheer chance our occupational nurse saw an advertisement for your keyboard and we hired one for both. Much to my amazement this seemed to solve the problem rapidly and five months later they are still in full time work doing the same job that caused the problem in the first place.
    • I was even more surprised to be told by one of them that due to a fault she used a standard keyboard and developed the symptoms within half an hour. We shall certainly use these keyboards as first choice if we have any other problems.
    • Yours sincerely,
    • Dr. J. Foster. Company Medical Adviser.

 

  • RSI Rehabilitation - by Dr John Foster - 5th March 1998.

  • The treatment of the RSI Group of disorders is undoubtedly complicated; it is becoming apparent that the group of problems called upper limb disorders is a varied and complex group and there are many ways of approaching the problem.
  • One of the ways that is gaining acceptance is by the use of rehabilitation techniques such as are used in chronic pain syndromes. Patients will probably encounter this approach in 'Pain clinics' where the use of cognitive behavioural therapy is practised along with other aids to recovery. There are unfortunately long waiting lists on the NHS for this kind of treatment and there does not seem to be much chance of these shortening in the near future.
  • There are however some bright spots on the horizon, one of which is the government's interest in getting people back to work and their willingness to provide money for treatment of long-term sufferers and there is no doubt that many RSI sufferers will come into this category. As yet this is all in its infancy, but bids have been put forward for money with the treatment of RSI conditions in mind.
  • One of the treatment centres that has put forward proposals of this kind is Sketchley Hall in Hinkley. This is a centre which specialises in the treatment of musculo-skeletal conditions. Previously it has concentrated on back and neck problems but now has courses designed for RSI sufferers specifically. It is hoped that if Sketchley Hall is successful in it's bid, that this course can be fully operational. Obviously being a non NHS centre it has to obtain funding from somewhere. It is also hoped that industry may see the importance of this rehabilitation avenue and will fund some of its employees in this course.
  • One of the aims of the course is to get people back to work as it doesn't see 'cure' as a theoretical concept but something that will be expressed in the fact that the patient / employee is back at work. In patients who have upper limb disorder this means that they will have to return to work and for most of them, this will mean some form of keyboard work. It is therefore hoped that part of the rehabilitation process will be retraining on an ergonomic keyboard so that the fear and indeed possibility of recurrence of the symptoms is reduced.
  • One of the most successful keyboards has been shown pragmatically to be the Maltron design. This is one of the rehabilitation aids which will be used by the patient, as there is a self training module which will enable the patient to learn at the same time as the course continues.
  • It is hoped that with an ergonomic keyboard and the training in pain management and an increase in general fitness that this may be an enlightened approach to the overall problem of returning to work. This does not exclude other forms of treatment which the patient may need but it is a more comprehensive way of tackling this growing problem of pain associated with the increased use of keyboards.
  • While there is no certainty that a MALTRON keyboard will give recovery, experience so far, as reported above, shows that RSI sufferers who do adapt to it obtain a substantial reduction in pain with improved freedom of movement and recovery of career prospects. From this it follows that failure to offer this option could leave both Company and adviser open to a charge of failure to exercise "Due Care" in the event of legal action.
  • Specifications:

    • Width: 43cm | 17"
    • Depth: 22cm | 8.5"
    • Height: 10cm | 3.75"
    • Weight (trackball): 1.0kg
    • Weight (no trackball): 0.9kg
    • Connectivity: USB
    • Cable Length: 1.5m (approx)
    • Compatibility: PC and Mac depending on model
    • Keyboard Layouts

 


 
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How to Use the Guide
The matrix below is intended to help align keyboards with conditions or disabilities.
Keyboard models are arranged across the top row, and down the left-hand side is a list of conditions and disabilities in alphabetical order. Simply pick a keyboard or condition, and cross-reference it using the grid. The intersecting column or row will indicate with ticks or a cross which of our products may be appropriate.
Two ticks Two ticks denotes the most suitable keyboard, one tick One tick.denotes that the keyboard may be suitable in certain cases. Just hover your mouse pointer over the ticks for more information.
To find out more information about any of the keyboard types, just click the image.
You can also click on the listed disabilities to visit a page where it is described in more detail.
Click the Back button on your browser to return to this page.
The list will be added to over time, but in the meantime if you would like to see a condition added, please do not hesitate to contact us.
A note about Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) and Work Related Upper Limb Disorders (WRULDS). These are broad terms covering a range of conditions, the most common of which are included below. If you suffer with RSI or WRULDS, it is likely that it will be caused by one of these. However, if in any doubt, please seek professional medical advice.
Please also note: The guide is not definitive, and shows only potentially suitable keyboard/s for any given circumstance. If in any doubt, please contact us and we will be happy to help!

 

PCD Maltron logo
Keyboard Selector
Single hand keyboards Dual hand 3D keyboards Dual hand 2D (flat) keyboards Single digit or head/mouth stick keyboards Expanded keyboard
Amputation
Two ticks. Where amputation has led to a need to type with one hand.
Cross
Cross
One tick. The head / mouth stick keyboard may be appropriate where both hands or some of the fingers are lost due to amputation
Cross
Bursitis
One tick. The Frequency of Use layout on this keyboard will reduce finger movement and hand/wrist strain for bursitis sufferers who use one hand to type.
Two ticks. This keyboard will reduce finger and wrist movement, and hand / wrist strain when typing. The optional Maltron key layout would further reduce finger strain. Typing is done with hands and fingers in a neutral position.
One tick. May be suitable for bursitis sufferers who use two hands to type, but prefer a flat keyboard.
Cross
Cross
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome One tick, suitable for CTS sufferers, or anyone who uses one hand to type.
Two ticks. Suitable for CTS sufferers who use two hands to type. Typing is done with hands and fingers in a neutral position. The optional Maltron key layout would further reduce finger movement.
One tick. Suitable for CTS sufferers who use two hands to type, but prefer a flat keyboard. Cross
Cross
Cerebral Palsy (CP) Cross Cross Cross Cross Two ticks. Suitable for impaired motor control, and can be used with the toes.
Epicondylitis
One tick. The Frequency of Use layout on this keyboard will reduce finger movement and hand strain for epicondylitis sufferers who use one hand to type.
Two ticks. This keyboard will reduce finger and wrist movement, and hand / wrist strain when typing. The optional Maltron key layout would further reduce finger strain. Typing is done with hands and fingers in a neutral position.
One tick. Suitable for epicondylitis sufferers who use two hands to type, but prefer a flat keyboard.
Cross
Cross
Paralysis
One tick. A single hand keyboard may be appropriate where due to paralysis, only one hand is useable for typing.
Cross
Cross
Two ticks. The head / mouth stick keyboard is recommended where use of both hands is lost due to paralysis, but head movement is possible.
Cross
Parkinsons Disease
Cross
Cross
Cross
Cross
Two ticks. Large keys with expanded key spacing and an integral keyguard make this keyboard suitable for anyone suffering with low to moderate hand tremor.
Stroke
One tick. For cases where a stroke has diminished use of only one hand, a single-hand keyboard may be appropriate.
Cross
Cross
Cross
One tick. For cases where a stroke has caused reduced motor control in one or both hands, the expanded keyboard may help to improve accuracy or to enable typing with the toes.
Tendonitis One tick. The Frequency of Use layout on this keyboard will reduce finger movement for tendonitis sufferers who use one hand to type.
Two ticks. This keyboard will reduce finger and wrist strain when typing. The optional Maltron key layout would further reduce finger movement. Typing is done with hands and fingers in a neutral position.
One tick. Suitable for tendonitis sufferers who use two hands to type, but prefer a flat keyboard.
Cross
Cross
Tenosynivitis
One tick. The Frequency of Use layout on this keyboard will reduce finger movement for tenosynivitis sufferers who use one hand to type.
Two ticks. This keyboard will reduce finger and wrist strain when typing. The optional Maltron key layout would further reduce finger movement. Typing is done with hands and fingers in a neutral position.
One tick. Suitable for tenosynivitis sufferers who use two hands to type, but prefer a flat keyboard.
Cross
Cross
Use single digit or pointing stick to type
Cross
Cross
Cross
Two ticks, suitable for head stick, mouth stick, or single finger use, where there is no motor impairment.
One tick. Suitable for single finger, or use with the toes.
Vibration White Finger
Cross
Cross
Cross
Cross
Two ticks for extreme cases of vibration white finger. The large keying area and keyguard compensate for loss of feeling and sensitivity in the fingers.

 Special Order: This is not a stock item and is ordered specifically for you.  Unfortunately, no returns, no cancellation, so please call our trained staff with any questions you may have prior to ordering to ensure you make a well informed, educated purchase.  This sale is final.

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